Weed Going Mainstream as Popularity Reaches All-Time High

Is Weed going mainstream? Marijuana is more popular than ever before, according to recent research. As the legalization of marijuana becomes more prevalent across the United States, data indicates that the attitude toward cannabis is shifting toward the positive for many Americans.

More than half of Americans (58%) are in favor of legalizing marijuana, according to a recent Gallup poll. This tied Gallup’s all-time high poll numbers for marijuana legalization support.

Gallup isn’t the only researcher that shows the shifting culture around cannabis. A study by the Associated Press shows that 61% of Americans believe that marijuana should be legalized.

The numbers increase even further when it comes to medical marijuana. A poll by CBS News shows that 84% of Americans support medicinal marijuana.

Weed Going Mainstream: What Does the Data Mean?

With all of this increasing support for marijuana legalization, what is next? States that have legalized marijuana are seeing major tax revenue already. That combined with Americans’ increasingly positive view of marijuana could be a major influence on legislation for the states that are currently reexamining their own marijuana laws.

As additional data continues to be released and additional studies are commissioned on the effects of marijuana legalization, research is going to be a major player in the evolution of marijuana in the U.S.

California, Ohio and Florida Could be Especially Important

Much like during presidential elections, California, Ohio and Florida could be especially important when it comes to marijuana becoming even more mainstream. All three states have had legislation try to either expand or begin the legal marijuana process in their states.

California has allowed medicinal marijuana for years, but legalization would be a big boost for the marijuana movement due to the large number of residents that call the state home.

While Ohio and Florida have had recent setbacks in marijuana legislation, in Nov. 2015 and Nov. 2014, respectively, the states may still lead to major wins for the pro-marijuana movement. Marijuana supporters in both states continue to work toward gaining support and keeping the issue on ballots.

Even with the setbacks, individual cities in these key states have made steps forward. Tampa, Fla., for example, recently decriminalized marijuana.

As these key states continue to reexamine marijuana laws, they could have major influence in legislation for the rest of the country.

Since more data becomes available every time a state changes its marijuana legislation, even minor changes in marijuana laws could help to further weed going mainstream across Main street America.